Summer Projects: Work

At Summer Projects, the daytime summer job is not a mere means to an end. Rather, as a genuine means for sanctification, work is an integral element of our students’ preparation for lifelong Catholic mission. Every holy life involves the suffering and reward associated with career; the work experienced by students at Summer Projects is intended as preparation for this career. Every student attending Summer Projects is expected to work with excellence for 30 – 40 hours a week, depending on the job and location.

The exact nature and compensation for work will vary from location to location and job to job. Nevertheless, all three 2020 locations feature similar roles, so a few general observations hold true across the program:   

1.   JOB SPECIFICITY. Applicants should realize that, while securing a spot with summer projects guarantees a job with an employer, it does not guarantee any particular job. After being accepted to Summer Projects by FOCUS, students will be directed to fill out a secondary application with their assigned employer. Students will not know their specific job until after the processing of this secondary application, and employers are free to assign students in accord with the current needs of their company. Students should not accept an offer with Summer Projects unless they’re also willing to accept any position offered by our partner employers.

2.   JOB DIFFICULTY. As explained above, students will not know their specific job until after committing to Summer Projects. Some jobs are recreational in nature, but this is not the norm. Most students will work an ordinary, full-time job at a difficulty level one might expect for an entry-level position in the tourism industry.

3.   COMPENSATION. Student workers will be compensated by their employer through food, lodging and salary. All locations feature ordinary, cafeteria-style dining. Lodging is dorm-style rooms with roommates (most locations offer students the option to request roommates). In addition to food and lodging, employers also provide modest financial compensation. Overtime is often available, but you can expect a base salary for ten weeks at around $2,000 – $2,500. 

The exact nature and compensation for work will vary from location to location and job to job. Nevertheless, all three 2020 locations feature similar, so a few general observations hold across the program:   

  1. JOB SPECIFICITY: Applicants should realize that while securing a spot with summer projects guarantees a job with an employer, it does not guarantee any *particular* job. After being accepted to Summer Projects by FOCUS, students will be directed to fill out a secondary application with their assigned employer. Students will not know their specific job until after the processing of this secondary application, and employers are free to assign students in accord with the current needs of their company. Students should not accept an offer with Summer Projects unless also willing to accept any position offered by one of our employers.

  2. JOB DIFFICULTY: As explained in #1, students will not know their specific job until after committing to Summer Projects. Some jobs are recreational in nature, but this is not the norm. Most students will work an ordinary, full-time job possessing the requisite difficulty one might expect for an entry-level position in the tourism industry.

  3. COMPENSATION: Students workers will be compensated by their employer by means of food, lodging, and salary. All locations feature ordinary, cafeteria-style dining. Lodging is simple, dorm-style rooms with roommates (most locations offer students the option to request roommates). In addition to food and lodging, employers also provide modest financial compensation. Over-time is often available, but one can expect a base salary for ten weeks between $2,000-$2,500.